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Full text of "Druggists and dispensers practical show card instructor"

Ti 



DRUGGISTS -"■■ DISPENSERS 




DRUGGISTS AND 
DISPENSERS 

Practical Show Card Instructor 

PUBLISHED BY 

W. A. THOMPSON, 

PONTIAG, MICH. U.S.A. 



CONTENTS. 



How to Practice, Materials, etc 5-6 

Elementary Exercise ■ 7 

Marking Pen Alphabets 8-9-12-13 

Show Card Copies 10-11 

German Text — Marking Pen 14-15 

Rapid Old English — Marking Pen 16-17 

Automatic Shading Pen Sign Lettering 18-19 

German Text — Shading Pen 20 

Old English— Shading Pen 21 

How to Hold the Brush, Mixing Paints, etc 22-23 

Brush Exercises and Alphabets 24-25 

Soda Fountain Cards 26-27 

Single Stroke Brush Alphabet with Show Card Illustrations 28-37 

Italic Roman Alphabet 38-41 

Figures and Price Tickets 42-45 

Roman Alphabet (Brush Stroke) and Show Card Illustrations 46-55 

Modified Roman Alphabet and Show Card Illustrations 58-63 

Snow Capped Alphabets and Show Cardg 64-67 

Brush Alphabets — Shading °.'\. .« 68-73 

Show Card Brush Text :•'.'.'. 74-75 

Brush Alphabet 76-77 

Old English Alphabet, Brush Work, Cards, etc 78-81 

Show Card Script 82-89 

Border Outlines 90 



Scroll Outlines 

Scroll and Background Designs, 



; Brush Effect. 



I'ISrARY of CONGRESS 

' 'Two Copies 'fieceiveb' 

MAY 241908 

,. Copynsnt Entry _ 
fclASS A XXc No 



.91-93 



PREFACE. 



THE OBJECT of this treatise is to give a practical course of instruction in lettering and designing 
necessary for making all styles of show cards and price tickets required by the up-to-date 
Druggist and Soda Fountain Dispenser. The exercises and alphabets are fully illustrated and 
presented in simple form, showing the make-up of different letters and figures by combining 
vercical, horizontal, oblique and curved lines. In addition to a full variety of practical alphabets and 
exercises, a large number of business-bringing show cards are reproduced which will enable any one 
of ordinary ability to make attractive card signs in spare time that will increase business. 

The making of rapid and neat show cards by the aid of this book will be found a simple mat- 
ter, even for those without the slightest previous experience or knowledge of lettering. The work 
of the entire book embodies the latest and most approved forms and methods for quick results, which 
will commend itself at once to business men and clerks of practical ideas, as being a Valuable Show 
Card Instructor. 

W. A. THOMPSON. 
Pontiac, Michigan, 1909. 



COPYRIGHT 1909 

BY 
W. A. THOMPSON 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



MARKING PEN LETTERING. 

HOW TO PRACTICE, MATERIALS, ETC. 



For the beginner in lettering a No. 1 Marking Pen is 
recommended, which throws a solid line % of an inch 
wide. The marking pen is a strong and perfect device 
for rapid and clean cut lettering, and the use of these 
pens — different sizes, 1-16 to y 2 inch wide — will enable the 
learner to acquire a substantial and easy method of rapid 
and uniform lettering. 

INKS — A good ink is very important for neat work. 
Common writing fluid is too thin to produce a deep color 
or brilliant letter. You need ink strong in color with 
enough Gum Arabic in it to be about the consistency of 
common syrup or mucilage. This will keep the ink 
from flowing too freely. 

For an extra quick and clean method to make marking 
or lettering ink, take a package of ink powder (see page 
100) and dissolve the same with soft water in a small, 
wide mouth bottle. The ink powder will dissolve instant- 
ly and make an exceedingly strong solution which will be 
sufficient to make several bottles of good lettering ink. 

Now, all that is necessary is to take good gum muci- 
lage (Gum Arabic) of the quantity required, — generally 
about an ounce, — and color the same by adding a few 
drops of the ink powder solution. Very litt" 3 of the so- 
lution will produce a beautiful shade of rich, glossy let- 
tering ink. If the ink should be too thin, add a few 



pieces of gum arabic about the size of a pea, — this when 
dissolved will bring it to the proper consistency. If the 
ink becomes too thick, thin with water only. By making 
your lettering ink in this way, five cents worth of muci- ' 
lage will be enough for a number of small bottles, ready 
for any color, and the quality of this ink will be equal 
to the best on the market. 

CARE OF PENS — Before you commence place a glass 
upon your table containing about half an inch of water, 




then place pens in this as in glass on table in Figure 1. 
This wili keep them in good order for doing nice work. 
When a method of this kind is not used the pens are 
liable to get clogged, which is very vexing, as rough and 
broken lettering is the result. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



PRACTICE PAPER — Any paper of a smooth and firm 
surface will answer. Wrapping paper of a fair quality 
or unfinished book paper will give good results. Don't 
use paper of a glazed surface for either pen or brush 
practice. 

USING INK — Never dip marking pen in ink. Figure 2 
shows a neat and quick method of inserting the ink in 




FIG. 2. 
pen. Take a toothpick, lead pencil or small splinter of 
wood, dip same in bottle, then drop ink by this means be- 
tween blades of pen, one or two drops at a time. Don't 
overload your pen. For inks see page 107. 

HOW TO LETTER — Practice a few minutes with a 
dry pen, following the strokes or principles given in the 
first exercise, then write copes of same on your practice 
paper. Before commencing to letter see that your pen 
throws a full and clear stroke. Have a small slip of 
paper at hand to make test strokes before beginning on 
any particular work. If you are careful a base line will 
be ail that is necessary to preserve the proper position. 
Go slow, study the position and movement of the differ- 
ent characters. In lettering always use downward pres- 
sure and only sufficient to make the ink flow. The pen 
should never be moved upward unless running edgeways. 



HOW TO HOLD THE PEN— Observe Figure 3 closely, 
take the pen in your hand and hold it in an easy and 
natural way as suggested in this illustration, see that 
the nib of the pen is at an angle of about 45 degrees from 
the base line, and preserve this position in all marking 
and shading pen lettering. When you have caught the 
idea you have already learned one of the first essentials 
for rapid and ornamental lettering with an easy move- 




CARDBOARD — Use common white cardboard, 4 or 6 
ply for ordinary size cards. Card board of a moderately 
smooth or unglazed surface is the best to use for all 
styles of pen lettering. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Elementary Exercise. Marking Pen. 






Practice on the above exercises and hold the pen about 
the same as an ordinary lead pencil, see Fig. 3. Always 
keep the pen point at one angle in making straight lines 
and curves. The one position or angle of pen holds good 
in all styles of pen lettering. See that the pen cotains 



enough ink, — not too much. The pressure of pen should 
be enough to secure a full and even stroke. Note the 
form and make up of the above letters and practice care- 
fully. For full alphabet see following pages. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Marking Pen Lettering. 



MM&M££& 


MlMdM.UM.0.. 


M.D'P..0MSTUL 


1/MX.X3&...4& 



In the accompanying illustrations we present a very 
desirable alphabet for neat and rapid work. The size of 
letters may be varied according to the size of pen used. 
Any size pen from 1-32 to a half inch wide can be used 
to good advantage. 



In lettering always use a downward pressure and only 
sufficient to make the ink flow. The small figures and 
arrows show the order in which each stroke is made and 
combined for a finished letter. In practice always aim 
to have the capital and small letters correspond in slant. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 


@&k.£.dM..0g.b. 


jyMjmjm^/p0:^S^. 


Mup wx.yiii^A& 


iJ^M^^M^Mi^XXL. 



The small arrows in above illustration show the di- 
rection of each stroke in the make up of different let- 
ters. When movement exercises are practiced the utmost 
pains should be taken to repeat them with precision, and 
each effort should be carefully looked over and studied 



to find the faults by comparison with the copy. 

For practice work use a No. 1 or Marking Pen, and 
make the letters larger than above copy. 

For Marking Pens, see page 105. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Copies. 





Honest Prices. 
Honest Goods. 


,, 



fiorit Forget 
the Little ones 
at noma. 











Qve us a chance 
to phase you. 

















Jf we please you, 
■Ml others. 

Jf we don't, tell us. 













Hair Ionic 

Cleanses and invigorates 
the scalp, prevents dandruff 
and falling out of the hair. 







Toothache J>rops 

Safe, Sure, Quick. 





Everything 

for 4he 

lot lei and £ath. 


,,.. , 




The above cards were lettered with a marking pen at 
a good rate of speed and will give an idea of the style 
of work that all beginners may do with very little prac- 
tice. This. class of work can be done very quickly when 



using the style of alphabet as given on pages 8 and 9. 
Always use black ink and white cardboard for small 
cards. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Copies. 



Goods 

Jmporfed 
and 



^0^^ 



fitw 
Prices. 





dire ful, tfompefenf . 
Registered Pharmacia 



Compound everu 
Prescription. 



**&* 



>Qs£ 





Stop 

that 
Couffh 

MUeHoiv. 

1 







Jally if 
Roses 

for 

chapped hand* 
face and Up$. 





to good advantage in an endless variety of show cards. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Marking Pen Lettering. 



Lft-~0t<*&4. 




IU1 f.t 



A4j 
UVWXV& Aft 



In the illustrations presented herewith the student will 
notice the letters are vertical instead of a slanting style 
as given on pages 8 and 9. 

In practice, study carefully the exercises given in the 
first line of both illustrations and see that you have the 
proper slant of pen from the base line. The small figures 
show the order in which each stroke is made and com- 
bined for a finished letter. 

This alphabet may be made very rapidly and also have 



the appearance of being somewhat tasty, without extra 
effort, as the letters are formed by natural and rapid 
strokes of the pen. The size of the letters may be 
varied by making the letters tall and slender or by mak- 
ing them low and extended. Study and practice es- 
pecially the form and make-up of each letter, then you 
will be in good position to vary the proportion of letter- 
ing and wording on either small or large cards and 
tickets. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 



& gt, ib<^ $ & f <$ jf ^ * jj k I w n 

Popular G,oo&.$, Sirxir'icnery, 



The lower case letters given in the above illustration and do good work with ease. It's a common fault with 
will be found interesting, as a few simple strokes make most beginners to use ink that is too thin and in many 
up the full set. For the best results in practice always cases this is the point where most all students fail for 
see that your ink is thick enough to throw a full and the want of a little careful study in keeping lettering ma- 
even stroke without blurring and you will save time terial in good working order. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

German Text. Marking Pen. 



CDipfoma*, <ttr\r'ificah& f 

In pratice on this styK hold the pen with the point method of building up each letter as suggested in B, G, 

at the same angle from the base line as that given in H, etc. Use a good grade of ink that will flow free and 

preceding pages. Note the construction of the letters dry hard. The main thing is careful practice and close 

by the small figures in the accompanying illustrations. observation. Practice on familiar words, names, etc., 

First get good control of the principal strokes given in and concentrate your mind on the subject. Study form, 

the first line of the above illustration, also note the spacing and proportion. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



German Text. Marking Pen. 



German Text is one of the most useful alphabets and to be able to execute in a fiinshed and artistic manner 

is now extensively used for engrossing and all purposes all styles of Text Letters in the way of filling in Diplo- 

where a display is desired beyond that of ordinary writ- mas, Stock Certificates, Records, Memorials, etc. 
ing. It is a decided advantage to the show card writer 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD I NSTRUCTOR. 

Rapid Old English. Marking Pen. 



Ifatitmaf iBank, &<ipid, 



The exercises and alphabets in the accompanying illus- retouching, as the letters are formed by natural stroke 

trations are made entirely with the marking pen without of the pen. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Rapid Old English. Marking Pen. 

In this style of lettering, the curves and straight lines plenty of practice in order to be made neat and compact, 

can not help but come uniform when the pen is held at Practice on the different strokes as shown in capital 

the one angle from the base line as indicated. While letters A, B, C and D. These movements will give you 

this alphobet appears to be easily made, it must have good control in this style of lettering. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Automatic Shading Pen Sign Lettering. 

^•£4 &*, ft' -UW^ f <&& <$; 
SlW &*»?&$,, Sl^M'5; Scb;. 



In shading pen lettering always hold the pen at one 
position or slant from the base line as indicated in the 
first line of above illustration. Practice and study on the 
simple strokes as given above will enable one to make 
rapid progress in this style of alphabet. In. this style 
you will notice that two shades of color from the one 
color of ink is made with each stroke of the pen. 

To combine the shade or flat tint in this style of letter- 
ing, careful study in the construction or makeup of each 



letter is very important, as success with the shading pen 
depends almost entirely upon a definite knowledge of how 
and when each part or stroke of the letter is made and 
connected. 

In practice use a No. 4 or 5 pen and make your letters 
about three-quarters to an inch high. When you have 
mastered this style of alphabet you will be able to do 
very creditable work in other styles, such as German 
Text, Old English, etc. Full alphabet next page. 






In making B, first make the stroke at the bottom, then per- bottom up and from left to right. For instance, in making the 

pendicular stroke, then middle stroke as numbered in illustra- letter H, first make vertical stroke, then join cross bar and 

tion, then top horizontal stroke and curve downward connect- follow with last vertical stroke, also in making letter S, first 

ing with the third stroke as shown in copy. make bottom stroke, then run second stroke and connect with 

In shading pen lettering always remember to work from the lower stroke, then add top stroke as shown in alphabet. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



German Text. Shading Pen. 






Note the first two strokes in "A" (upper case) also the three 
strokes required to make "C." Pay particular attention to the 
at tint or shading of tin- letters clear an'.l (Vis- makeup of these two letters and practice on the component 

r card board of a moderated s6f1 and smooth parts separately. The small figures show the order in which 

imenried for all styles oi shading pen work. the different parts are made. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Rapid Old English. Shading Pen. 






The one position of the pen holds good in all styles of pen the pen. practice on any familiar wording and be sure to keep 

lettering. Always remember to work from base line and your letters compact, the space between the words should oc- 

from left to right. This is important. After you have a fair cupy about what is required for two letters in ordinary 

knowledge of the formation of the letteis and easy control of wording. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Lettering. 



The card writer should have the hest Red Sable Show 
Card Brushes. Four special sizes are recommended, as 
follows: Nos. 5, 7, 9 and 12, for a good variety of work. 
Many beginners make a mistake by using Camel's Hair 
brushes, which do not have the required elasticity for 
good clean lettering. Red Sable brushes are the best to 
use and will give entire satisfaction. 

How to Hold the Brush. 

The brush should be held similar to the manner of hold- 
ing a lead pencil, except that the brush should be held 
more upright, — see following illustration. 




Practice Paper. 

Any paper of a smooth and firm surface will auswe 



Wrapping paper of this quality will give good results. 
Don't use paper of a glazed surface for practice work. 
Show Card Paints. 

For general show card work, water colors are the best 
to use. Prepared colors are recommended whenever it 
is handy to obtain them. They are put up in jars ready 
for imemdiate use and all colors can be had in this form. 

A very good and serviceable show card paint may be 
made by yourself. The colors usually employed are 
termed "Dry Water Colors." They can be had at any 
druggists' or paint supply house. Vermillion, ultra-marine 
blue chrome yellow, lamp black or drop black and flake 
white, also some good Gum Arabic mucilage to use as a 
binder. 

Mixing. 

Mix any desired color with water to make it the con- 
sistency of thick dough and then add a little mucilage 
for a binder and thin with water to a free flowing liquid 
paint. Always keep your paint rather thick, as this will 
enable you to make full and clean cut strokes with the 
lettering brush. Distemper colors put up in glass jars 
can also be used to good advantage and in many cases 
preferred to that of mixing paints. These colors can be 
made ready for use by adding a little water and a little 
gum mucilage. Very little mucilage is required, in fact, 
too much will interfere with easy flowing qualities neces- 
sary for good lettering. In colors of this kind a little 
glycerine in addition to mucilage will produce a water 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



color paint with free flowing qualities equal to a fine 
grade of oil paint. 

The position at table or desk is the same as in pen 
lettering, see illustration. 




The accompanying illustration gives a good idea of the 
principle upon which a very serviceable drawing table 
can be constructed by any one in a very short time. The 
dimensions given are the best for general use, but the 
table can be made smaller or larger to suit. The table 
can be either three, four, or six feet long. 

In working, place the table so that a good, strong light 
falls upon the surface from the left hand side or from the 
front. By adjusting a chair or stool to the proper height, 
the show card writer will find that one is in a position to 
do better work than ever before, and with greater speed, 
accuracy and satisfaction. 




In beginning practice take each exercise on the follow- 
ing page and practice carefully. Make the letters 1% to 
2 inches high, and use a free movement. 
Cardboard. 

The choice of the right cardboard, — right as to size, 
color, thickness and surface, — is often half the battle in 
making an effective show card. Common white cardboard, 
4, 6 or 8 ply, of a moderately soft surface, is the best to 
use for general work. Don't use cardboard of a glazed 
surface. For small cards 4 ply will give good results. 
Six or eight ply should be used for large card-signs so 
that they will stand up and retain their shape when in use. 

"SHOW CARD" cardboard manufactured especially for 
show card writers, is an excellent article for general use. 
It is coated on one side and comes in a number of beau- 
tiful shades — black, silk green, blue, red, and maroon. 
Full size sheets are 22 x 28 inches, both in white and col- 
ored stock. These sheets are usually cut into the follow- 
ing sizes: Half sheet, 14x22 inches; quarter sheet, 11x14 
inches; eighth sheet, 7x11 inches; sixteenth sheet, ZV2 x 
5% inches. These are all good sizes for show cards and 
allow the full sheet to be cut up without waste. 



Brush Lettering Exercise. 



/mwm/M, 




alphabet. The stroke of letter "l." light and left curves of 
er "o" are used and combined in the make-up of most 
ry letter in this alphabet. The small arrows indicate the 
?ction of the brush in making the letters. Hold the brush 



ferent strol 

in the make-up of different letters. The first two lines in the practice"on"one*size of"lett 



. similar to that of holding a lead pencil), 
pt that the brush should be held more upright. 



in uic inaK.<--iiii mi hum hi n.is. jnc nisi nni unes in me practice on one size of left, a uniil mhi have it thm-rmo-hi 

illustration give the foundation lor qui, k results in this style tered. nave it tnorougnj 



Brush Stroke Alphabet. 


AB€0£f$N/JK 







The brush stroke alphabet presented herewith is easy, neat 
and practical. These letters may be made very rapidly with- 
out any. retouching or filling in. They are made by the one 
stroke method, and the size or width of stroke may be varied 
by the size of brush. 



The short, small lowe 
should be about one-half 
etc., which are the sara< 
letters. Learn to raise t 
lettering. This style of 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Soda Fountain Cards. 





C/ioco/aie 


|[ /c e Cream Soda ]| 


/4t -fhe f<DLin-t<3/n 





For permanent cards, considerable care should be taken in 
the preparation and wording, while the temporary card merely 
calls for "something neat and quick." 

The outline given in the accompanying illustration suggests 
a quick method for changing a soda fountain window-card. 



This same style can be used to good advantage in any con- 
spicuous place. Scores of different names of drinks on nar- 
row card strips, as shown by "Ice Cream Soda," can be read- 
ily attached to the background of a permanent card and also 
removed on a moment's notice by the use of two stout thumb 
tacks, as indicated. 




The accompanying- illustration shows a variety of inexpen- 
sive card-signs that can be duplicated by any one in a very 
short time in single stroke brush lettering. 

They can be made very attractive_in all colors of card board, 



Cards such as "Oriental Sundae" given in the illustration 
may be jl.x' inches, or smaller. Cutting the cards to this 
size will give sixteen out of a full sheet 22 x 28 inches. Larger 
sizes may be cut without waste, such as 7 x 11, 11 x 14 inches, 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Alphabet, Single Stroke, 




The brush stroke alphabet given on this page will en- 
able the card writer to do very rapid work in a large 
variety of show cards most any size and shape. For neat 
work in this style of lettering, a good brush and a free 
flowing paint is very important. Always use a round 
show card brush with square ends. A brush of this 



kind when charged with color can be made to retain a 
fine point or brought to a chisel edge that will make each 
stroke of the letters in this alphabet with a single opera- 
tion without any additional straightening up when you 
become familiar with the working of the brush and a free 
movement. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 




(12 QjD&jf* 




Considerable practice should be given to the simple 
stroke exercise given in the first line of illustration (see 
1 age 28). Practice on strokes about twice the size cf this 
copy. The small arrows indicate the direction of each 



stroke. The lower case letters are made up of a few 
simple strokes and if this alphabet is practiced carefully 
it will enable all to do creditable shew cards in a neat 
and satisfactory manner. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Single Stroke Brush Exercise. 




In single stroke brush lettering always have your brush 
well charged with color and practice on exercises about 
the size given in above illustration. A No. 9 brush will 
throw a line or stroke the same size as given above with- 



Por Show Card Brushes, 



Show Card Copies. 




Helpful 
Hint " 

for those puzzling an 
" IVhai to Bulxj " 




lend a suggestion for further pra 



ntrol of the 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 



WeAre 
Prepared 

for the 
Holidays. 




to writ e with , 
to write upon, 
to figure upon, 
to draw upon. 



I Its Policy J 
\ to make your* y 
/ .selections early, j 



V For That all-in- J 

down-and-out 
\ feeling, try our I 

'Acme Tonic. \ 



The lettering on the cards presented on this page are 
all made up of the single stroke brush alphabet. This 
style of lettering can be used to good advantage in an end- 
less variety of show cards for most all purposes. 

For the beginner in laying out the wording on cards it 
is advisable to make a sketch or guide in spacing with a 



lead pencil before using the brush. In this way you will 
be enabled to have the lettering and composition of each 
card well balanced. 

In your practice study carefully the movement of the 
brush in making each letter of the alphabet. For a rapid 
and accurate method for making border outlines, see 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 





We Never Fail 

to please those 
fffio mnt the best. 





Urihg Your Next 
prescription here . 
M fill ihem rigid. 



No Article 
hut what 
we can 
save you 
rnoney on. 

—Investigate 




Use a good show card paint and a medium size brush 
for cards of this style. The pressure of the brush on 
cardboard should be sufficient to make an even stroke. 
When your paint is in good working order the grip of the 



brush in lettering on paper or cardboard will check or 
steady the movement so as to be under easy control for 
accurate work. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Lettering. 



HIJi'KLMIfO 

ms»fiSTuv 

This style of alphabet can be made very rapidly and accur- bar or center stroke of B, B, F and H should be a little above 

ately by all who have a fair control of the lettering brush in tne center. The bottom of K should be wider than the top. 

practice on elementary strokes such as perpendicular horizon- *, For , ma t kil l s the sm * u spur finish on this al P«abet, note the 

tol nnA f ^„ „■„,,♦ „„j i„« • „, t , * n t . ■ „ three last characters in above plate. The first is made by a 

£«££ nav ^fpntin^ ti , ?J j£££f i * , makin °t he f natural stroke of the brush, then the light line strokes are 

attention to a few general rules as follows: For A, added as indicated in the second. The third shows number 

part. The cross one and two finished. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 



Note the small arrows; these show the movement of the brush in making each letter. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR- 



Soda Fountain Cards. 




For clean-cut lettering always 
heavy body. Distemper colors 
when thinned with water and 



i show card paint of a 
give very good results 
i mucilage added for a 



A small portion of ; 
i advantage for easy 
t about the consistency 
i good Red Sable show 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Layout. 




Designs similar to the card "Perfun 
tration, should be made on a half 
Try to keep your cards small and ; 
aim to bring out the lettering so ar 



perfume and confectionery 

tractive, and not too large. 

nes," as given in the illus- 

leet card 14 x 22 inches. 

it in design, but always 

iged that it will be easy 



"With colored card board, 
of flitters, metallics, etc.. f< 
ishing touches, a new dre; 
entire store can be given i 
getic clerk. 



■aint, and two or three colors 
!ling and putting on the fin- 
msiness vim throughout the 
than one hour by any ener- 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Italic Roman. Brush Stroke. 




In brush stroke practice the pressure and handling of of letter "O" the student should learn to swell the stroke 

the brush should always be under easy control. The gradually and lessen the pressure on the brush just before 

principal strokes of the above alphabet form a very pleas- reaching the base line. All the letters in above illustra- 

ant study, because a little study and practice brings no- tion can be made quickly and easily. It's better that 

ticeable improvement. In oval or curved strokes in the they be made easily and with a fair degree of accuracy 

makeup of letter "C" and also the right and left strokes than to be the result of strained effort. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Exercise. 




Brush strokes and letters of the above size will enable 
the student to practice with considerable freedom in mak- 
ing well balanced letters. The principal strokes should be 
practiced until you have them thoroughly mastered. Then 
try the combinations of each and observe the copy closely 



and study how the different forms are connected before 
attempting to execute them. It takes time to become 
skillful in any work, but those who have the ambition, vim 
and determintion to persevere are the ones who wlil suc- 
ceed. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. To Alphabet on pag e 38. 



A h ii/kllmn opq 
rsttuvvwwxxi/z 



In practice on the lower case letters, the student should 
review the straight oblique lines and curves on first line 
of the above illustration asd study how a few simple 
strokes are used in the make-up of different letters. The 
small arrows indicate the movement of the brush. In 
brush stroke practice the main thing is to have your 



paint and brushes in good working order. When atten- 
tion is given to this and the study of the component parts 
of the letters, all beginners and those of experience can 
accomplish in one hour's practice what many fail to ac- 
quire in days and even weeks of practice without a 
thoughtful, systematic method of study. Aim to do your 
work neatly and always use good material. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Outlining Exercise. 




Sfuefi/ ^Practice. 



The accompanying exercises show an easy method for out- 
lining letters in this style of alphabet. Note how the strokes 
are connected to bring out a full and well balanced letter. 

Have your paint and brush in good working order so that 
clean-cut strokes can be made without retouching. The ar- 
rows show the direction of the different strokes. Slant well 



to the right. In making V and 
carefully, see that your first strok 
angle as indicated by 



study form and slant 

run at about the same 

letter W. In the small letters 

the construction and different styles of finish shown in 

These suggestions will enable one to make 

of styles that will fit special designs in a neat 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Figures. 



IIZZZ 


332K 


ssjsr 


Z3S5BX 


jM&^kwl 


'"•7'"^"«L" 


•€$/....«..UJI/IJr... 



To make these figures easily and rapidly the first requisite 
is a knowledge of form. The next and most important is a 
free movement with the lettering brush under easy control, 
which only comes by proper study and practice. 



r price ticket work, use a No. 7 or 9 show card brush 
see that your paint is thick enough to throw a full and 
stroke. When your paint is in good working order a 
i be made with the lettering brush 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Price Tickets. 




2 








^*> 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 




Making price tickets, medium size cards, etc., will be about 
the first call on the student in lettering. For the best results 
a good plain style of figure should be used and considerable 
practice given to the makeup of each figure so that it can 
be well and quickly made in proportion to fit any size of 



price ticket or card. 

The variety of shapes given in the accompanying illustra- 
tion may be used to good advantage in different display- 
Generally it is better to adopt < 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Solid Gold 

,+15?* 



Sterling 
Silver 
O50 




Odd and peculiar shapes can be 
card board very rapidly and when 
attract attention. Always aim t< 
small and compact and at the sam 
' 1 proportion. Do not make " 






> large, 



at from white or colored 
icely finished are sure to 
have your price tickets 
time the letters and fig- 
mistake of having your 



; they will obstruct the 1 






wavs lend the idea of the goods being crowded. Make a very 
small and neat card with figures brought out well balanced, 
place the same on goods, then stand back and view it, and 
the chances are that you will be surprised to see that this 
ticket appears to be much larger than it really it. and of 
course doing its work more effectively than a larger card or 
ticket in general display. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Stroke Alphabet. 

sm:cke:eo: 


ODKLMSO 


PQRSTUV 


:w:xxz:<£z 



For ease In producing a practical brush stroke alphabet of a 
Roman style, one should have a good knowledge of form and 
makeup of the different letters in order to make them quickly 
and faiily well balanced without outlining. 

The kind of lettering brush and paint is also very impor- 
tant for quick work. Always use Red Sable show card 



fine line c _ ... 

very creditable work without retouching. The alphabets pre- 
sented herewith give a good suggestion for practice and it 
will pay all interested in rapid lettering to master this style 

1 - Mv •■'>■ ■' ".m.kTful variety of neat show cards can be 

made with this style of alphabet. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 



ibcrfef 




hij klrnnopq 

rstnvwxyz. 
<Brush Stroke 



Careful study of the component parts of different letters 
that are similar to others will aid the student to make rapid 
progress and also enable him to criticize his own work on 



In practice always have a definite object in view. Every 
time a letter has been carelessly repeated incorrect a move- 
ment backward has been started . This is a fact not suffi- 
ciently appreciated by the student in elementary practice. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOn. 



Brush Exercise. 




Show Card Roman 



i shown in the 
i for developing 
style of alpha- 



Good control of free hand brush strokes 
above illustration, will be found the best m( 
the student to make letters accurately in t 
bet with considerable speed. 

In studying form and construction of letters, the begii 
should learn to sec correctly and to understand what he i 
This is only acquired by constant study and practice on 
component parts of the different letters, because no one 



know or thoroughly understand every detail of the principal 
strokes until he has drawn them. 

Note the strokes given in first line of accompanying illustra- 
tion, also the method of handling the brush. Note lower case 
letter "h," begin the second stroke with a light line or chisel 
edge stroke and carry to the right, then curve downward to 
full width of stroke and carry the same to base line. Upper 
rase letters similar to that of letter "D" are made by handling 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Exercises. 



IIEhPBBb 


tCccDQQ, 


L6GPR5S 



In practice on above exercises, use a No. 7 or 9 Red 
Sable sbow card brush and make the letters about one 
inch high and upwards. The vertical strokes are made 
by bringing the brush to a chisel edge. If your paint is 
in good working order the brush will retain this shape 



and enable you to make clean cut strokes as shown in 
first and second part of "h" without retracing. Curves 
and ovals can be made very accurately at one stroke 
when the brush is worked to a chisel edge with free 
flowing paint. 



Special To-day 




PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 



If a 
Prescription 

is correctly written 
we can fi'jl it no 
matter if the name 



Carbolic Acid 
Lotion 



The style of lettering used in the accompanying show 
card illustrations can be used to excellent advantage by 
all who wish something that will insure quick work and 
good reading qualities. The letters are made rapidly and 



finished as you go. With a good brush and a free flow- 
ing show card paint of a heavy body anyone can produce 
a variety of well lettered cards in a few minutes. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 



Quality 

Tells the story c 
a true Bargain 



Styles 



The Luxury 
of the Best 



A New 
\\ Season i 




The above show cards give a suggestion on form and the same ^ 

arrangement of wording. A large variety of similar erly done, 

cards can be made very quickly. In show card layouts, is to keep 
simple ornamentation may be used with good taste and 



ill always add considerable snap when prop- 
The main thing in ornamental arrangement 
rithin the limit,— don't overdo. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Soda Fountain Cards. 



Oriental 

5undae 
to*- 



Freeze 



Belfast 



Plain and 
fancy 

Mixed 
Drinks 

at the fountain. 



Punch 



(0 colate 

Sundae 



Soda Fountain cards in various colors — Silk Green. 
Blue, Maroon, etc.— cut to 7 x 11 inches, will enable the 
card writer to make a neat variety of effective show cards 
in a few minutes. For a quick and showy effect, use 
white paint for lettering and Crimson or Dark Green flit- 



ters in shading the letters or other ornamentation, and 
run a white line around edge of card about half an inch 
wirle. This will produce a card substantial in appear- 
ance with strong reading qualities. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Soda Fountain Cards. 



phosphate 



J Our 

S Jersey 
Cream 




Healthful and 

¥t2 



trip 
Back Home 



Cherry 
£tindae 



Show cards for the fountain need not be confined to 
the fountain alone. They may be placed in the show 
window to good advantage. Many a hot, tired and thirsty 



pedestrian has been lured from the heated walks by the 
pleasing window cards which tell of cooling, refreshing 
and healthful beverages to be had within. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Roman. 



in.ippxca 

AABCDEFGHU 
KLMNOPQRSTU 

VWXYZ.&.S 



This alphabet may also be made in broad and extended 
letters as suggested by letter "S" in last line of the above 
illustration. Use a good size brush and it will enable 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 



a&bcdefc|<£hi 
jklmnopqrs 

tuvwxyz. 
Brush Stroke 



There are only a few characters in the make-up of the 
entire alphabet and the one who acquires a free and full 
movement with the brush will win. Be sure to master 



each stroke. Frequent reviews are necessary for good 
work and the only short cut to success in lettering. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Layout. 



Toilet — 
— Goods 

/mported ' & Domestic 



The above card — Toilet Goods — represents easy and 
rapid brush work. The lettering being made almost by 
the one stroke method, which will enable all beginners 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Layout. 



our rnysician 

aims to put a// his /cnow/edge, 
experience and s/c/7/ /nto 
his prescr/pt/on. 

You W*MT it fif/ed right 



and that /s our specialty. 



The pressure of the brush on the practice paper or 
cardboard should be sufficient to make a full and even 
stroke. A good show card brush, either No. 9 or 12, will 



variety of neat show cards for 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Modified Roman. 


IIIKIMIO 


:fqmbt:uv 


MXYZ& 



The construction of the letters in this style is somewhat 
similar to that in a single stroke alphabet, with the ad- 
dition of a second or third stroke on the broad or heavy 
parts of the different letters. 

Note the make-up of letetr A, the first part is a single 
downward stroke, the next part is made with two down- 



ward strokes, and a third added when the two parallel 
lines do not join as indicated above. All the letters, 
both upper and lower case, are made in a similar way, as 
indicated by the small figures given in the above and 
following illustrations. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 







Standard 



Outside of good brushes, an easy flowing show card card work is a reasonable amount of patience and plenty 

mint is necessary. The main thing for success in show of practice on graded copies in a systematic way. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Exercise. 




In prctice first aim to get a good knowledge of the 
form and make-up of the different letters and do not 
hurry or condemn the study and 1 practice of simple 



strokes and small details, for you will find in this work 
(as in many other lines) that which is often neglected in 
beginning becomes in the end of most importance. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 




Fancy 
Monogram 
Stationery 



Cherry 
Balsam 



A Ma<>ic 
Balm 

for Catarrh 
Cold in -the he 
Croiup, E-tc 



Cold 

Cream 



For show card practice, try something of the above 
order. Aim to have the letters prominent yet compact. 
Small cards neatly arranged have stronger reading quali- 
ties than larger cards without care in spacing and ar- 



rangement. 

This style of lettering will admit of being condensed or 
extended to fill any reasonable space with good ctrong 
reading qualities. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 



and ihm pri'a 
made hy us. 



J>/<? family of ihe. 



Settle all 
Doubt 

by examining 
the ^oods. 

2fej/ speak stroqg er 
than we can. 



Fragrant 

as the flowers 



Holiday 
Goods 



be easily done by busy merchants and clerks with very 
little preparation in the line of show card lettering. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 




Sfe&h-r* 



Creations 



for 
this 
Season 



^m 



As \ 






This style of alphabet is used quite extensively among 
card writers and those who have good control of the 
lettering brush can quickly produce well balanced letters 
almost equal to that of many who spend considerable 



time in outlining, etc., before making the letter wit 
brush. 
For method of making border outlines see page ! 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Snow-Gapped Alphabet. 



.Al£BEE& 



This style of alphabet can be used to good advantage In making these letters they are simple you keep in 

by the card writer for special headlines or complete mind that the form of same is largely of a broad single 

show cards almost any season of the year. In early fall stroke letter. With a good show card paint and fair 

and winter seasons the suggestion of cold weather is ability in handling the brush very neat and original show 

coupled with cards lettered in this style. Very effective card work can be done very rapidly in this style. 
Soda Fountain cards can be made with this alphabet. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Lower Case Letters. 



9 9 



al»€.d#fgh. 

n@w- Capped 




Practice on letters from one to two inches high will give 
good command in movement and will enable one to do 
smaller or largerwork in a neat manner. Learn to use 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustration. 



teCm. 


AM 


ANI> 




m fy$$m 


$9$$. 


I®* 





Th above card and those on the folowing page will 
lend a suggestion for the lay-out of card signs for Ice 
Cream Parlors, Drug Stores, etc. When using white card- 
board and black paint the letters may be outlined and 
filled in, leaving the white portion or snow-capped effect 
as shown in alphabets. On colored cardboard, such as 
Blue, Black, Red, Brown, etc., the letters may be made 
complete in one color and white paint added at top of let- 



ters, suggested for snow. Diamond Dust sprinkled on 
the white paint before it dries will add to the appearance 
for snow and ice effect. No particular form or method of 
stroke is required for putting on the white paint. Ap- 
parently careless strokes of white paint will look well 
when finished with a narrow line around the white paint 
where it overlaps the face of the letter, as shown in illus- 
trations. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 




PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Lettering. 






This style of alphabet can be used to good advantage illustration, or they can be made in any color, 
for prominent wording in special show cards. It is plain When the body of the letter is made in color, the out- 

in reading qualities, unique n appearance when harmoniz- line and shade of letter is added afterwards in a light or 

ing colors are used, and fof the card writer it has a de- dark harmonizing color. In this style of lettering there 

cided advantage over many fancy styles. is a good opoprtunity to bring out colors in light and sha- 

The letters may be made open and shaded, as shown in dow by the use of intermediate tints or tones of color. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 







Nothing is more beneficial for clean accurate lettering, 
after a good movement has been acquired, than a pains- 
taking criticism of your own work. After faults have 
been located, then study the movement and forms of the 



letters and do your best to correct them. In free hand 
show card lettering, very little improvement can be looked 
for unless a systematic method of practice is adhered to. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Shading. 



mm 



In practice on shading or lettering of show card de- 
signs use black or one color until you can do fairly good 
work. Be careful in using colors. Don't make a red 
letter and shade it with blue or equal strength of color, 
or vice versa. Don't use a variety of colors or a differ- 



ent color for each letter of a word you want to bring out 
prominent. Don't make the upper half of a letter red 
and the bottom blue; if you do you are going to produce 
a card that is hard to read and lacks taste. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Shading. 




mwnm . 




Several styles of finish in shading and shadow may be 
used in connection with most all alphabets and they will 
admit of many modifications, both in construction and 
finish. There is no limit to originality and improvement 
in display lettering. 

The suggeston given in the two illustrations — Painting- 
Show Cards — presented herewith will enable the student 
to make a complete alphabet of each style. In doing this 
work be careful to preserve nearly as possible the same 



features of shadow in every letter. There is no end to 
the variety of colors and tints that may be used in this 
way and at the same time at a trifling cost. 

Very neat initials can be made in this same manner 
by slightly modifying the letters and adding a simple 
scroll or border outline. This will be found splendid 
practice, as it gives freedom of hand in drawing and will 
show in what a variety of styles of finish an. alphabet 
can be used. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Egyptian Alphabet, Shaded. 







By applying thickness or shadow any style of alphabet This style may be made very effective by outlining the 

can be brought out very prominent as shown in the two letters as given herewith and adding the thickness or 

accompanying plates. The slant or angle of perspective shading in colors. The letters may also be painted in 

used may be slightly varied, but all letters on the same one color and the thickness or shadow when in harmoniz- 

line should have the same angle or inclination in shading. ing tint will produce a very striking effect. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 










PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Brush Text. 



vwxvz, & 

abc6cfgl)ijklmn 



With a good knowledge of the form and construction 
of the letters, the above alphabet can be made almost 
entirely by the brush stroke method. In making the 
letters the principle thing is to learn to raise the brush 



and replace it skillfully. At first no attempt should be 
made at speed, the principle thing is to study the form 
of the characters used in the making of this style of 
alphabet. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



J\6v&ncc 



This style is more rapid in execution than generally 
believed. Practice with a No. 9 or 12 brush and use a 
free flowing show card paint of a heavy body. This will 



enable one to bring the brush to a chisel edge or fine 
point so that most all the characters used in this alpha- 
bet can be readily made by the brush stroke method. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Rapid Brush Alphabet. 



A 




KLMND 
KSTEV 

ZJF3 



In rapid single stroke brush lettering there are just 
two movements of the brush to be used, — from top to 
bottom, and from left to right. 

Be careful to have your brushes and paints in good 
working order. This with practice in handling the brush 
will insure full and smooth edges on the letters. 

Practice carefully on perpendicular stroke of letter B, 



as shown in last line of above illustration, and try to 
get them uniform. Begin each stroke by a natural 
touch of the brush and slightly swell in width of stroke, 
then gradually diminish to the same as that of beginning. 
The first stroke of X should slant more to the left than 
first stroke of either "V or W. Learn to raise the brush 
and replace it skilfully. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Lower Case Letters. 



abcdeifgli 
ijkiiiinopq 

:r:s±:ii:\ r :\v:x:y: 
z:±b, Rapid 



Careful study on the form of full brush stroke alphabets 
and also Roman alphabets will enable one to make rapid 
progress in this stye of lettering. Always keep on the 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Old English. 




Old English alphabets will be found very serviceable to 
all card writers for special work. In practice on this 
style, if you are a beginner, outline each letter complete 
before filling in. Be careful not to get the light lines or 



joinings too heavy, as this will have a tendency to make 
your work appear heavy and clumsy. In outlining the 
small arrows show the direction of each outline stroke 
in the make-up of the letters. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 




I:m:m:m:x:^:s:.:: 




If you have good control of the brush you will find 
that quite a few component parts of the different letters 
can be made at one stroke very accurately with consider- 
able speed Always keep your paint in good working or- 



der; this will assist you in getting clean, sharp edge 
strokes and at the same time your brush will readily re- 
spond to ilght or heavy pressure in producing the differ- 
ent characters. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Brush Exercise. 




Uniform and free movement with the lettering brush 
is the foundation for success in this style of lettering. 
The size of the brush will depend upon the size of the 
lettering required. For letters about the size given in 
above illustration, a No. 7 Red Sable show card brush 
and a good grade of paint will enable you to do neat and 
rapid work. For larger lettering a No. 9 or 12 brush is 
recommended. 



This style of lettering is more rapid in execution than 
generally belived by those not familiar with the forma- 
tion of the component parts, and how easily they are 
joined for well balanced effect When you have fair con- 
trol of the formation of the letters, practice on the fol- 
lowing show cards will assist you in keeping the letters 
uniform and compact. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Illustrations. 



Jwtid&ig 



Jiijjks 




Cards similar to "Exclusive Styles" may be made 
11x14 inches. Colored cardboard and white paint for 



lettering, or white cardboard and most any color of 
show card paint will give good results. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Card Script. 




The accompanying script copies were made chiefly by 
the brush stroke method. The stem stroke used in the 
first part of B is one of the most important characters in 
this style of alphabet. Most all letters can be made by 
easy and natural strokes of the brush and this method 
may be developed so that any card writer can produce 



results that will seem wonderful to sign painters unac- 
customed to this class of work. 

In practice slant well to the right and use a free move- 
ment. Ease in execution will do more towards making 
your letters smooth and full than anything else. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 




Small letters in above illustration, — a, c, e, etc. — 
should be about two-thirds as tall as h, k, and 1, which 
are about the same heigth as the capital letters. Study- 



form and practice carefully on stem strokes and ovals 
and in a short time you will have this alphabet well 
under control. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Practice Copies. 




Careful study and practice on above exercises will en- 
able the learner to make very rapid progress in this style 
of lettering. All the above characters are natural strokes 
of the brush. The small arrows indicate the direction of 
the brush in each movement. The second oblique stroke 
as shown in first line of above illustration is made entire- 



ly with the one stroke. The movement is downward and 
finished with curves at base line and upward without re- 
moving the lettering brush. Practice at this point will 
enable all to make clean-cut ovals as in a, o, c, etc. After 
thorough practice and study on these exercises, try word- 
ing some of the following cards. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Show Cards. 









gjleiectect- 







Remember to give all your letters the same slant 
and make the letters considerable larger than those 
given in above illustration. For good success in brush 
lettering, always use round Red Sable show card brush- 
es with square ends; These brushes are admirably 
adapted to all styles of lettering, either broad or nar- 



row one stroke work. When charged with color they 
can be made to retain a fine point or instantly brought 
to a flat chisel edge. They are sensitive in touch, 
elastic in stroke, and give ready response in clean cut 
lettering. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Script Outline. 




The outlines of above 
to all who wish a substantial 
making well balanced letters. 



will be found valuable 
isis or system of form in 
Study the different parts 



of the letters and you will have little trouble in making 
rapid progress and often be surprised with the accuracy 
and simplicity of doing this class of work off-hand. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Lower Case Letters. 






O 



In making letter a, first make o, then start outline of i 
close to the right. For d, use the same form and extend 
the i stroke upward to the height of letter t. Finish h 



like n, and b like v. The small arrows show the direc- 
tion of the brush and method of outlining the different 
letters. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 




The stem characters given in first line of illustrtion will 
be found very important in making capital letters. The 
ovals of small "o" give good practice for easy control of 
the small letters. Note the relation of this letter in the 
make up of other letters in first line, — c, e, d, g, q. The 
first part of small "d", "g", "q" is made just the same as 



small "a." 

Note the form and construction of letters "1" and,"h" 
as given in second line. Both styles are given — loop and 
square top. Either way may be used, that depends on 
one's fancy. The top of small "s" and "r" should extend 
upward above the line of other small letters. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 




After a little study and experience any one can make 
a small card or price ticket have more prominence than 
that which many inexperienced card writers use — which 
is generally twice or three times larger than necessary. 
If you are a beginner t ry a doezn or so cards and tickets 
about half the size that is generally supposed to be cor- 



rect, and finish these in neat lettering well proportioned 
to the size of card, and you will discover that there is 
considerable study in making effective cards for trays of 
goods in show cases and other conspicuous nooks and 
corners where goods are displayed. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Border Designs and Outlines. 




Afc.3. 



rio.^h 





For beginning, a simple design has been given which 
will enable one to get practical reusults from the start. 
For outlines to be true and well balanced on both sides, 
as shown in No. 2, simply take a sheet of paper the size 
of the card to be used, fold this once, making it one-half 
size. Then cut the same around the free edges with a 
scissors, as indicated in No. 1. This when unfolded will 



give a true outline and very accurate. 

Illustrations Nos. 3 and 4 show the result when the 
pattern paper is folded twice, making it one-quarter size. 
This when unfolded will show the entire outline well 
balanced. There is no end to the effective border out- 
lines that can be made in this way. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Scrolls and Background Designs. 




The accompanying scroll patterns, Nos. 9 and 10, are 
made similar to those on preceding page, the only differ- 
ence is the following scroll patterns retain the same out- 
lines both top and bottom of each design, and the ends 
also are uniform. This is done by folding the pattern pa- 
per twice, making the same one-quarter size of the full 
design. A very simple cut or scroll outline on paper 
folded one-quarter size will produce quite an elaborate 



and accurate design when unfolded. Scroll designs of 
every description made in this way can be preserved for 
future use by cutting out cardboard patterns of each de- 
sign. In this way cardboard outlines will enable one to do 
quick work and they are also more serviceable than paper 
patterns. All scroll designs should be made so that let- 
tering or composition of card will show out prominent. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Scroll Outlines and Show Cards. 




The above practice copies of scroll outlines should be 
made free-hand with an ordinary lettering pencil. The 
small figures and arrows show how each outline is made 
and also the direction of the lettering pencil in each 



stroke. 

Careful practice and close observation will enable any- 
one to excel in this line in a very short time. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Show Card Illustrations. 




The following cards are lettered with the Marking Pen 
alphabet (see pages 8-9) and the- scroll outlines from pre- 
ceding page. Very neat and effective work can be done 



in black and white and each design brought out promi- 
nent. To bring out similar scroll cards with tinted back- 
ground, see following page. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



Scroll and Background Designs. 



Background tints combined with scroll outlines as given 
in the illustration on following page can be produced with 
common dry colors applied with a small wad of cotton 
batting or a piece of plush. For a simple outline as 
given in A-l, first cut out the pattern from card board or 
common straw board. Place this upon the show card 
and hold the same firmly with the left hand, then with 
the right hand dip the wad of cotton batting or plush in 
dry color (any desired shade) then rub around the edge 
of pattern and extend outward in a circular motion. Use 
considerable color along the edge of pattern and gradu- 
ally work out to a faint tint. After you have finished 
this, remove the pattern and run a scroll line as shown 
in A-2, with a No. 7 or 9 lettering pencil. Any color may 
be used in making the scroll outline that will harmonize 
with the background tint. The other design presented 
may be treated in the same way and will lend a sugges- 
tion for many different varieties on the same principle. 

Good work in tinted backgrounds can also be produced 
with an atomizer. The same method of using patterns 
may be employed and the work done more rapidly than 
when using dry colors. The space or surface protected 
by the pattern remains white, or color of the cardboard 
used, while the background is shaded by the spray of 
fluid color. 

Avoid using colors of the same depth of tone side by 
side. It usually gives the work a muddy or hazy ap- 



pearance. Care must be taken in any kind of plain and 
ornamental work in order that it may be uniform and har- 
monious. 

In using an atomizer for spraying color, first fill the 
bottle of same about half full with fluid of the desired 
color, which can be q.uickly made by dissolving ink pow- 
der in water. Very little of the ink powder solution when 
diluted with water will be sufficient for a good number of 
ordinary show cards. Hold the bottle in one hand and 
bulb in the other, squeeze the bulb, then release the pres- 
sure and the bulb will fill by suctios. Repeat this move- 
ment and a spray will follow from nozzle that can be eas- 
ily regulated. Hold the nozzle of atomizer about 14 inches 
from card or design you wish to work on. Begin the 
spray at lower left hand corner of design and gradually 
work upward to top of design, then along top and down 
right hand side and along the bottom. The depth of color 
of back ground can be made a light or heavy tint at the 
will of the operator. 

When a fine spray is desired without spreading, add 
about a teaspoonful of mucilage in bottle of atomizer with 
color. 

When mucilge is added the solution will give good or 
better results after being made for a day or so. 

For delicate tints and even shading the best results 
are obtained when the bottle of sprayer is less than half 
full of color. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 



r 




f 




z 


Q^ 




MP 1 "*"' 


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J* '*' 


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In putting tinted backgrounds on colored card board, 
remember that the ink powder solution is transparent, 
consequently, Red sprayed on Blue card board will have 
a pronounced purple shade, while Blue on Yellow card 
beard will show up Green, and so on, the underground 
color always prominent in modifying the shade or color 



effect when transparent paints or inks are used. 

All colors of ink powder solution will have a fine effect 
when used on White Card Board and produce hundreds 
of pretty shades in backgrounds and delicte tints. 

For ink powder see page 100. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 




A great deal depends upon the style of lettering to pro- 
duce strength of reading qualities in the show card. A 
narrow hodied letter on a heavy scrolled background al- 
ways gives a weak appearance, the scroll in this case in- 
variably detracts from the value of the lettering. Another 
error is made by putting scrolled letters on a scroll 
ground when plain lettering should be used. Always aim 
to have contrast in lettering and scrolls, both in style and 
delicate tints. 



The scroll and tinted background cards presented here- 
with are made up of the practice copies given on page 95. 
Very rapid and ingenious combinations can be produced 
by following this method of designing. Almost any simple 
design cut in straw-board pattern and a delicate tint of 
color added around the same when placed on a show card 
will produce a neat effect and the appearance changed 
wonderfully by a scroll or border outline. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 

Show Card Designs. 




Pictures taken from Trade Journals, Daily Papers and 
other publications and combined with simple scroll de- 
signs, backgrounds, etc., as given on page 95, will give a 
good suggestion for considerble originality to all begin- 
ners and those of some experience. 

Different styles of pictures cut out true in outline and 
pasted on a card with suitable wording will make very 
attractive show cards and when properly done will give 
every evidence of being made expressly for the occasion. 
When you select a picture for this work, cut it out neatly 
— that is, follow the outline of entire illustration, tben 



give the back of the same a liberal coat of paste and 
place the picture outline exactly where you want it on 
the card. Now, place a sheet of white blotting paper or 
anything of a similar nature on the design, so that you 
can press it firmly to the card. Always use a white 
blotting paper or a clean rag so that you can press it 
firmly to the card. White blotting paper or a clean rag 
will absorb any mucilage or paste that may appear 
around the edges of the picture in order to make a clean 
finish. 



PRACTICAL SHOW CARD INSTRUCTOR. 




The show cards presented herewith embrace three styles 
of alphabets that are simple in construction, neat in ap- 
pearance, and afford a good practical variety for a wide 
range of work. 

The single stroke alphabet as shown in cards "Pre- 



scriptions" and "Good Clothes" can be used to good ad- 
vantage for card signs in any line of business. 

Many styles of border outlines and panel designs for 
show cards can be made by following the directions given 
on page 90. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



SHOW CARD WRITERS' BRUSH OUTFIT. 

EXTRA FINE RED SABLE SHOW CARD BRUSHES. 

Nickel Plated Ferrules, Polished Handles, 

Four Special Sizes, Nos. 5, 7, 9, 12 

PRICE, $1.50 postpaid. 

The Best Shov> Card Brushes that Money can buy. 



Letter Pencils and Brushes. 

EXTRA FINE OX HAIR LETTERING PENCILS. 
In nickel plated ferrules, with highly polished handles, 
perfect elasticity and ease in lettering. 

No. 1 12 cents each 

No. 2 12 cents each 

No. 3 16 cents each 

No. 4 18 cents each 

No. 5 20 cents each 

No. 6 20 cents each 

No. 7 25 cents each 

No. 8 25 cents each 



Sign Writers' Ox Hair Brushes. 

FLAT, CHISELED EDGE. 
(Fancy polished handles, nickel ferrules) 
This brush contains, the purest, selected Ox Hair, and 
is a practical tool for the Sign Man. 

% inch wide 30c each 

Vz inch wide 40c each 

% inch wide 50c each 

1 inch wide 60c each 

1% inch wide 75c each 

1V 2 inch wide 90c each 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



"Thompson's Ink Powder" For Papid Pen Lettering. 



Makes a beautiful glossy ink for ticket writing, show card work and ornamental lettering of all kinds. As- 
sorted colors — Black, Blue, Brown, Red, Purple, Yellow and Green. Full directions for making shading ink. Choice 
of colors, 10c "per package. Card writers can save money by using this Ink Powder for general pen lettering. 

Air Brush Colors — Red, Blue, Green, Purple, Brown, Black and Yellow. Choice of colors, 10c per package. 

Concentrated Colors — No substitute added for bulk and each package will make an exceedingly strong solu- 
tion. Will not clog the brush. 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED. 



FLITTERS 




For sparkling effects, Gold, Silver, Crimson and Green, package, 15c, 
package, postpaid. Diamond Dust, 15c per package, postpaid. Address, 



FLITTERS 



Bronzes, any color desired, 15c per 



W. A. THOMPSON, Pontiac, Mich. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



Eureka Show Card Paint. 




The Twentieth Century Lettering Medium, ground by machinery 
and ready for immediate use with the addition of water for thinning. 

DRIES QUICK HEAVY BODY 

EASY LETTERING 

This paint is made expressly for brush lettering, display signs, 
show cards, price tickets, etc., and fully answers all the varied re- 
quirements — sets up firm in lettering, will not rub, scale or crack, 
and for cleanliness of application cannot be excelled. 

The onlyShow Card Paint that will show up in full strength of 
color on any colored surface. 

SEVEN COLORS. Put up in screw top jars. 

PRICES: Red, 30 cents each. White, Blue, Green, Yellow, 
Purple, Black, 25 cents each. These prices are net. Shipped by ex- 
press, charges collect. 

Transportation on Show Card Paints may be reduced by ordering 
a supply at one time, as express charges on or two colors will amount 
to about the same as that on a dozen lot. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



Letter Patterns for Up-to-Date Sign Lettering. 

Store Fronts, Awnings, Board Signs, Muslin Signs, 
Banners, Etc. 



The use of letter patterns, not stencils, but true out- 
lines cut from the best quality of pattern stock, showing 
the letter itself, is now used by the most experienced sign 
writers. With a good outline of letters to begin with, 
sign work is two-thirds done, and is a decided advantage 
to the expert as well as the beginner. A pattern that is 
cut true will always give a trtfe ouline. These patterns 
are .ready to work from, they will not warp or get out of 
shape like paper letters, and with proper care will last a 
life time. 

The styles presented in the following list are the re- 
sult of much study and careful observation and will en- 
able the beginner and those of some experience to do a 
first-class variety of sign lettering in a neat and satisfac- 
tory manner. 

HOW TO USE THEM. 

In general sign lettering, place the patterns upon the 
surface on which the letters are to be used, so that the 
spacing will be even, and proceed to outline them by 
. running a sharp pointed pencil around the edge of the 
pattern. This will give a correct outline of the letters 
and ready for painting any color desired. 

Very few sign painters shade letters correctly, but shad- 
ing may be correctly done with patterns. First mark 
around the pattern to show the face of the letter then 



move the pattern to the right or left, which ever way you 
desire the shading and drop as far as you wish the shad- 
ing to extend, and run the pencil along the outside edge 
only. This will make the shading, all except joining the 
shades of the letter, which should be done with a line at 
an angle drawn from the point of the shading line to the 
point of the letter. 

Any man or boy without previous knowledge of draw- 
ing or forming letters can do up-to-date sign work with 
these patterns. They enable the beginner to equal the 
work of many sign writers with years of experience. 

See the following illustrations, also price of each size, 
etc. In sending an order, note the class or style you 
desire, lso size of letter wished. 

Each set listed consists of 26 letters and character &. 
Lower Case Letters to match any size or style may be 
had for the price quoted on captial letters. When four 
or more styles are ordered at one time, forwarding by ex- 
press is often advisble. When this is desired, remit only 
the net amount of order, without postage. 

In all orders write name and address plainly. Remit 
by draft, postofnce or express money order. Small 
amounts, one and two cent stamps accepted. Please do 
not send private checks. 

Address all orders 



W. A. Thompson, Pontiac, Michigan. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



Letter Pattern Prices. 



tyle SO Style. 32. Siyle 34- . 

(Si Am 






Style £4. Style 66. Style 68 . 



2 inch letters 25 cents per set Postage 3 cents 6 inch letters 50 cents per set Postage 10 cents 

3 inch letters 30 cents per set Postage 3 cents 8 inch letters 60 cents per set Postage 12 cents 

4 inch letters 40 cents per set Postage 6 cents 10 inch letters 70 cents per set Postage 16 cents 

12 inch letters 90 cents per set Postage 22 cents 

Each 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



FIGURE PATTERNS. 



Figures outlined rapidly by running a lead pencil along the edge of 

pattern. This will give a correct outline ready for painting 

any color. Any style at the following prices: 





Siyte ¥-9. 







2 inch, per set of 10 .... 15 cen 

3 inch, per set of 10 20 cen 

4 inch, per set of 10. . . .25 cen 

6 inch, per set of 10 30 

8 inch, per set of 10 .... 35 cen 

10 inch, per set of 10. . . .40 cen 



Postage :-...: 2 cem 

Postage -.- 3 ceni 

Postage 4 cem 

5 cem 

6 cem 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 105 

Marking and Automatic Shading Pens. 

SHADING PENS. MARKING PENS. 

Make a Shaded Mark of Two Colors at a Single Making a Solid, Plain Mark, Strong, Full 

Stroke of the Pen. Strength of Color. 

No. Size Price No. Size Price 

1-16 inch wide 20 cents each q 1.32 inch wide 20 cents each 

1 1-8 inch wide , 20 cents each each 

2 3-16 inch wide 20 cents each 

3 1-4 inch wide 20 cents each 1 !" 8 men wide 20 cents each 

4 3-8 inch wide 20 cents each 2 3-16 inch wide 20 cents each 

5 1-2 inch wide 20 cents each 3 1-4 inch wide 20 cents each 

6 3-4 inch wide 25 cents each 4 3-8 inch wide 20 cents each 

8 7-8 inch wide 25 cents each 5 1-2 inch wide 20 cents each 

PLAIN PENS. 
For Making Background Tints, Etc. 
No. Size Price 

1-16 inch wide 20 cents each 

1 1-8 inch wide 20 cents each 

2 3-16 inch wide 20 cents each 

3 1-4 inch wide 20 cents each 

4 3-8 inch wide 20 cents each 

.5 1-2 inch wide 20 cents each 

6 3-4 inch wide 25 cents each 

8 7-8 inch wide 25 cents each 

Sample Lettering Free. Address, 

W. A. THOMPSON, Pontiac, Michigan. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



AIR PENCILS 



This class of work presents the appearance of fine embossed lettering, but ii 
and more attractive. Lettering of this kind can be made in any color, or in 
bronze, Flitters, Diamond 
Dust, etc., on wood, card- 
board and glass. » 

The operator simply man- 
ipulates the AIR PENCIL as 
he would an ordinary lead 
pencil, the raised work or let- 
tering being produced wholly 
by the pressure of the Air 
Pencil in the hand of the 
operator (see illustration). 
The work is very fascinating 
and executed with ease and 
rapidity. It is a money 
maker from the start. 

The letters are made with 
a soft lettering compound, 
which is prepared by the use 
of Alabastine or any similar 
preparation by mixing with 

water only, to the consistency of thick paste, which will flow freely from 
the Air Pencil and stand out upon the card, leaving the letters in relief. 

Material for preparing lettering compound can be obtained in any lo- 
cality at a cost of from 3 to 7 cents per pound, and part of a pound will be 
sufficient for considerable lettering. 

Price of Air Pencil ready to work with, 50 cents, postpaid. Address 

W. A. THOMPSON, PONTIAC, MICH. 






SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 




Automatic Shading Inks 

FOR MARKING AND 
SHADING PENS. 



In the production of this ink no pains or expense 
is spared to insure that the colors are the most 
brilliant and durable manufactured. This ink js 
prepared by a special process, thoroughly filtered, 
and every drop pure. It is of the proper consist- 
ency to letter smooth and free and will dry hard 
with gloss. Price, 25c per bottle, prepaid. 



Adhesive Ink, as shown in above illustration, top 
row to the right, is used quite extensively for gold, 
silver, metallic and diamond dust ornamentation 
on special show cards, posters, pictures, ano sduve- 
nir postal cards. It's the best ink made for great 
adhesive qualities and clean cut work with either 
pen or brush. Price, 25c per bottle, prepaid. 



Address, 

W. A. THOMPSON, Pontiac, Michigan 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



ShowcardWriting 




A Complete Course of Instruction in Show Card Lettering and 

Designing. 
COMPREHENSIVE LESSONS 

By mail is the modern, successful and economical method of learning show card letter- 
ing and designing. The progress made by my past students justifies the assertion 
that more can be accomplished by this means for the same expenditure than is pos- 
sible to obtain in any other way. 

This course of instruction has constantly grown in patronage and public favor 
and is now recognized as the Fountain Head for practical lessons, TJp-to-the-Minute 
Ideas, Quick Methods, and POSITIVE SUCCESS FOR ALL STUDENTS. 



SCIENTIFIC INSTRUCTION. 

I teach up-to-date PEN AND BRUSH LETTERING from the rudiments of a plain 
letter to a large variety of high class show card work for all business purposes. No 
one who is in any way inclined to become a good and rapid letterer should let this 
opportunity pass. The tuition fee for the full course of instruction will prove of 
small account compared to the cash returns that can be made by any one in' doing 
extra work, or followed as an exclusive business. It is not uncommon for proficient 
show card writers to make from $2.00 to $4.00 an evening in ordered work at home. 

If you are interested write for new catalogue. Address 




Emngfifrsp 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



IN REGARD TO COMPLETE COURSE 
OF INSTRUCTION. 



TIME REQUIRED. 

The student naturally desires to know how long it will 
take to learn to do a fair quality of work. To be precise 
with everyone, I cannot say. Ordinarily one lesson each 
week and do justice to the same would be good work for 
the average student. Those who can devote most of their 
time to study and practice often do more. Most all stu- 
dents do creditable work when they reach the fifth or 
sixth lesson. 

NO TIME LIMIT. 

The time may be arranged between lessons to suit the 
convenience of the student. We are interested in the suc- 
cess of all students and send lessons promptly as advised, 
or when sample of work on previous lesson is sent in for 
correction. The latter is generally the better way for 
rapid progress. 



WHAT THE COURSE CONTAINS. 

The complete course comprises an elaborate set of prac- 
tical lessons with corrections and special practice copies 
adapted to the needs of the student during the entire 
course. 

Each lesson, with expert corrections on student's work, 
contains over twice the amount of instruction and useful 
knowledge given in two or more ordinary lessons of other 
schools. 

METHODICAL ARRANGEMENT. 

The lessons are so well arranged that window trimme.-s 
and merchants, upon receiving the fourth lesson, are en- 
abled to make presentable show cards for their own use. 
Others who wish to commence earning money by making 
neat, saleable show cards may do so from the fourth les- 
son on to completing the course. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



A Valuable Book for Letterers. 

Modern Show Card Lettering, Designing, Etc. 




NEW AND REVISED EDITION. 



A practical treatise on Up-to-Date Pen and Brush Let- 
tering, giving instruction representing many styles of let- 
tering, position, movement, shading, spacing, designing 
and arrangement with illustrations of large and small let- 
ters of each alphabet, together with a full analysis and 
diagram for making neat and prominent figures off-hand 
for price tickets, etc. Over 150 illustrations of finished 
show cards and price tickets are given, with practical in- 
struction, outside of a large variety of standard show 



card alphabets. This book is far beyond anything ever 
published in this line. It contains solid, practical, com- 
mon sense instruction — a book that is free from absurd 
theories and mystifying kinks, and contains 2,000 adver- 
tising phrases for Card Signs, Posters, etc. The price 
of the book is but $1.00, delivered to your address. If 
you find the book not as represented, you have the privi- 
lege to return the same in good condition within three 
days, and I will return the money. Address, 



W. A. THOMPSON, Pontiac, Michigan. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



How to Paint Flowers, Scrolls and Fancy Borders. 



The delightful art of rapid flower painting, scrolls, etc., in water colors, for show card and poster designs is 
now taught in a short, simple and practical way. In former days few there were who could teach or give the 
necessary directions for rapid and showy effects for temporary work, and many a lesson was learned by tedious 
.experiments and hard knocks. 

Nowadays the beginner can gain in a few days or weeks, at most, the knowledge that cost many patient 
years of labor. The splendid colors and the varied and graceful forms of different flowers and scrolls makes them 
especially beautiful and appropriate subjects for ornamental designs in show cards, display signs and posters. 

Rapid Flower Painting, Scroll Work, etc., as given in this book, has many 
recommendations. It is easy (easier than ordinary lettering), is done with com- 
paratively little labor, and yet affords scope for the exercise of artistic skill of 
high order. Show card wrters, who lack the faculty for designing or drawing 
rapid and ornamental designs can easily double the value of their work by fol- 
lowing the practical instruction given in this book. It's exactly adapted to 
your needs. 

THE BOOK CONTAINS OVER 300 ILLUSTRATIONS. 




96 Flower Designs with instructions showing the make-up of single flowers 
and groups of same arranged for rapid aad artistic show cards, special decora- 
tive work and adveritsing designs. 54 Scroll Designs — complete assortment for 
plain and ornamental work. 93 Plain and Ornamental Borders for all purposes. 
Simple methods illustrated for quick and uniform show card borders. 53 Cor- 
ner Pieces, simple and elaborate designs. 42 End Pieces and Ornamental 
Dashes, together with index hand (right and left.) The above book mailed 
postpaid for $1.00. Address, 

W. A. THOMPSON, PUBLISHER, PONTIAC, MICHIGAN. 



SHOW CARD SUPPLIES. 



A NEW "MONTHLY MAGAZINE" 




The accompanying ilustration shows 



small outline of the cover page de- 



sign of a new publication, "The Show Card Writer," a handsome new illus- 
trated monthly. The first number was published September 1st, 1907. 

No Ad. Writer, Clerk, Decorator, or Show Card Writer can afford to be 
without it a single month. It is a credit to the craft, an inspiration to the 
worker, and a delight to the eye. Every page, every article, every illustration 
is clear and distinct. It shows you how to improve your skill, how to enlarge 
your field, and how to make money. 
One Dollar Per Year. Ten Cents a Copy. No Free Samples. 

Back numbers from October, 1907, can be had at 10 cents per copy Hun- 
dreds of subscribers say that each issue is worth the price of one year's sub- 
scription. Address, 

W. A. THOMPSON, Publsher, 
Pontiac, Mich. 



?